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All Sky Cam Images

 

The All Sky Cam produces wonderful 3600 views of the sky day and night.  The cloud patterns can be followed and atmospheric phenomena, such as a Sun halo, can be imaged. The Sun and the Moon are so bright they produce prominent artifacts in the images with blooming and internal reflections off the glass dome.  Also, dirt and water droplets can show up in the images. 

The major planets and bright stars down to the third magnitude are evident in the nighttime images with familiar constellations easily recognizable, such as Orion, Canis Major, The Big Dipper, Auriga, Gemini, and Leo.  On very good nights with no Moon or clouds, the Milky Way can be faintly appreciated.  Bright meteors are readily evident as are airplanes and bright satellites. 

Sometimes, it is necessary to consult HeavensAbove to determine if a bright trail on one of the images is a known satellite.  Cosmos satellites are common and run in the North-South (or South-North) direction.  They can simulate bright meteors.  Only when a bright North/South streak on an image cannot be identified as a known satellite, is it assumed to be a meteor.  Trails caused by planes have a somewhat different appearance and typically are in the Southeastern part of the sky reflecting the location of the two busiest airports in the Tucson metropolitan region. 

The camera software has a sensitive motion detection system.  It works well for finding meteors and satellites, but there are many artifacts from planes and random noise.  Image stacking software produces images with fainter stars.  There is bothersome blurring and star trailing if the stacking takes place beyond a time frame of 60 seconds.  A 360 degree panoramic view can also be obtained with the software. 

 

Representative All Sky Cam images. 

North is at the top, East is to the left.  Notice the 3 radio towers in the Northeast.  Tucson with its skyglow is to the South at the bottom of the images.  All times are local Mountain Standard Time (MST).

Sun Halo April 10, 2012
Night sky at midnight on January 18, 2012.
Cloudy sky on January 16, 2012 at 22:34 hours.
Quadrantid meteor on the morning of January 4, 2012.
       
Faint meteor in the Southwest.  The pre-dawn skyglow is bright in the East.
Bright meteor on the morning of January 14, 2012 at 4:36 hours.  The bright Moon is over-exposed producing a large globular artifact.
Cosmos 2056 Rocket producing North/South light streak on the evening of January 18, 2012 at 18:47 hours.  An airplane trail is also visible in the Southeast.
Bright meteor on the morning of January 21, 2012 at 5:53 hours.  No known satellite was listed for this part of the sky at that time.
       
Lyrid meteor on the evening of April 21, 2012.
Lyrid meteor on the morning of April 22, 2012.

Panoramic view of the evening sky on December 19, 2011.
Fireball on the evening of October 12, 2012.

       
Lyrid meteor on morning of April 22, 2013

Meteor on the morning of October 13, 2012.
Moon halo on the evening of September 27, 2012.
Moon halo on the evening of December 21, 2012.
Lyrid meteor on the morning of April 22, 2013.
       
Fireball August 12, 2013 Quadrantid meteor on morning of January 3, 2013 Perseid meteor on the morning of August 13, 2013 Perseid fireball after midnight on the morning of August 13, 2013
Fireball on the morning of August 12, 2013. Quadrantid meteoron the morning of January 3, 2013. Perseid meteor in the twilight on the morning of August 12, 2013. Perseid fireball on August 13, 2013.
       
Bug on All Sky Camera Moon halo December 5, 2014 Alien life form? Owl? Lightening
Spider on All Sky Camera on the evening of July 27, 2015. Moon halo on the evening of December 5, 2014 at 22:56. Alien life form? Probably owl sitting on All Sky Camera November 16, 2012 at 2:36 am MST. Lightening on the evening of June 26, 2015.
       
Leonid Meteor on morning of November 18, 2015 Cosmos 1437 satellite on the morning of November 18, 2015 Perseid meteor on the morning of August 12, 2016  
Leonid meteor at 4:07 am November 18, 2015. Cosmos 1437 satellite at 5:49 am November 18, 2015. Perseid fireball on the morning of August 12, 2016.  

 

Gemind Meteors on the Night of December 13-14, 2013

The All Sky Cam recorded 79 Geminid meteors on the night of December 13 and the morning of December 14, 2013. Eight meteors were recorded from 9:58 pm to midnight MST on the evening of December 13. On the morning of December 14 from midnight to 7:00 am MST, 71 meteors were recorded. There were four instances on the morning of December 14 where two Geminid meteors were recorded on the same image.

There was an 11 day old waxing gibbous Moon which significantly brightened the sky until it set at 4:46 am on the 14th. The Moon shows up as a bright spot with glare and scatter in most of the images. Jupiter is in Gemini below Castor and Pollux. Astronomical twilight began on the morning of December 14 at 5:49 am MST. Sunrise was at 7:17 am MST. In addition to the meteors being recorded, the SKYMED2 satellite was recorded at 6:01 am MST on the morning of December 14th.

 

Geminid Meteors on the Night of December 13-14, 2013

Gemind Meteor on the evening of December 13, 2013 Geminid meteors on the morning of December 14, 2013 Geminid Fireball Geminid fireball
Geminid meteor on the evening of December 13, 2013 at 2359 hours MST. There is a bright 11 day old Moon. Two Geminid meteors on the morning of December 14, 2013 at 0028 hours MST. There is a bright 11 day old Moon. Geminid fireball on the morning of December 14, 2013 at 0141 hours. There is a bright 11 day old Moon. Geminid fireball on the morning of December 14, 2013 at 0322 hours. There is a bright 11 day old Moon low in the west.
       
Geminid fireball Geminid fireball Geminid fireball SKYMED2 satellite
Geminid fireball on the morning of December 14, 2013 at 0332 hours. There is a bright 11 day old Moon low in the west. Geminid fireball on the morning of December 14, 2013 at 0413 hours. There is a bright 11 day old Moon very low in the west. Geminid fireball on the morning of December 14, 2013 at 0435 hours. The fireball is behind the three towers in the northeast. The 11 day old Moon is on the western horizon. SKYMED 2 satellite on the morning of December 14, 2013 at 0601 hours MST.

 


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